Top Stories

NASA Catches Tropical Cyclone Gaja’s Landfall

Caught in the act of landfall, Tropical Cyclone Gaja was seen by NASA’s Aqua satellite as it passed overhead and collected temperature information.

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Wildfires destroying California bring questions about health and climate

As wildfires continue to burn in Northern and Southern California, there are more questions than answers. What does smoke inhalation do to my health? What’s the evidence that these are caused by climate change? Can controlled burns fix our forests? Here is how some Stanford University experts answer and continue to tackle these complex concerns.

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PNW Woodlands Will be Less Vulnerable to Drought, Fire Than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry shows.

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Space-Inspired Speed Breeding for Crop Improvement

Technology first used by NASA to grow plants extra-terrestrially is fast tracking improvements in a range of crops.

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Study Links Social Isolation to Higher Risk of Death

A large American Cancer Society study links social isolation with a higher risk of death from all causes combined and heart disease for all races studied, and with increased cancer mortality in white men and women. The study, appearing in the American Journal of Epidemiology, says addressing social isolation holds promise if studies show interventions are effective, as they could be relatively simple and could influence other risk factors, as social isolation is also associated with hypertension, inflammation, physical inactivity, smoking, and other health risks.

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Half of the World's Annual Precipitation Falls in Just 12 Days, New Study Finds

Currently, half of the world's measured precipitation that falls in a year falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe.

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Sucking Your Baby’s Pacifier to Clean it May Prevent Allergies

If the thought of sucking your baby’s pacifier to clean it and then popping it in your baby’s mouth grosses you out, think again. New research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting suggests a link between parental sucking on a pacifier and a lower allergic response among young children.  

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Affordable catalyst for CO2 recycling

The catalyst in question has been deployed in hydrogen production. Still, with a few tricks, it can be adapted for other functions.

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The US military is testing stratospheric balloons that ride the wind so they never have to come down

The idea of a balloon that floats high up above Earth indefinitely is a tantalizing one. Solar power would allow such stratospheric balloons to operate like low-cost satellites at the edge of space, where they could provide communication in remote or disaster-hit area, follow hurricanes, or monitor pollution at sea. One day, they could even take tourists on near-space trips to see the curvature of the planet.

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What is the highest point on Earth as measured from Earth's center?

Mount Everest, located in Nepal and Tibet, is usually said to be the highest mountain on Earth. Reaching 29,029 feet at its summit, Everest is indeed the highest point above global mean sea level—the average level for the ocean surface from which elevations are measured. But the summit of Mt. Everest is not the farthest point from Earth’s center.

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